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Thursday, April 16, 2009

Twitter

In case you haven't noticed from my sidebar, I have a twitter account now! Etsy Dark Side Teammates let me know if you're on it too, so I can follow you! Here's my link: http://twitter.com/KitCameo

Friday, April 3, 2009

Fibroid Photos

So, just as I promised I'm posting the photos of my fibroids right here. These pictures were given to me by my surgeon, Dr. Landay. I'm going to put a large gap in between this paragraph and the first photo, because there are obviously guts involved, and I don't want anyone to accidentally happen upon my page and see something that will make them sick. Therefore, anyone who is interested in seeing what my fibroids looked like can scroll down the page for the photos and a bit more information...

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While you're scrolling, here's a picture of a fetus bottle I made! ;)

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Okay, so this first picture is of my large fibroid still attached by it's stalk to my uterus. The uterus is about the size of a pear, and as you can see there were three more smaller fibroids starting to grow as well. A fibroid is (usually) a benign fibrous growth that can be attached to the uterus via a stalk on either the inner or outer uterine wall, or enclosed within the muscle of the wall itself. The fibroid is basically an extra muscle growth that will start to appear once a woman reaches the age of menstruation, and usually will begin to shrink once a woman reaches menopause. No one yet knows what causes fibroids, and it's possible that mine will grow back, but researchers believe that it could be genetic, and that it's affected by estrogen and progesterone levels. It's pretty rare for a fibroid to get the size that mine did, which was 18cm; however, smaller fibroids are fairly common, with 20-80 percent of women developing them by the time they reach the age of fifty. If you'd like more information on fibroids in general, please take a look at this website, womenshealth.gov, which is where I got most of my information from before I went to the specialist. It's always good to be prepared ahead of time, so that you know what questions to ask!


This next photo shows the fibroid still on it's stalk, and if you look closely you can see a very large vein which is providing the blood supply that kept the fibroid growing. Occasionally the fibroid would twist on it's stalk, cutting off it's own blood supply, thus "choking" the fibroid. At these times there was extreme pain that lasted quite a while, and wouldn't dissipate with pain medications. In fact, the large fibroid was twisted twice over on it's stalk (you can see it a bit in the first photo), but somehow it managed to still keep a blood supply open, so as not to kill itself.


And finally, this last photo shows all the fibroids after they've been removed from my abdomen. Currently I'm still healing, so the pain hasn't gone away completely yet. The recovery time for an operation like mine (a myomectomy) is six weeks.